Manila goes nuts with theatrical rendition of Peanut’s ‘You’re a good man, Charlie Brown’

You probably grew up knowing Snoopy and the rest of the gang, which Charles Schulz had immortalized in his internationally known comic strip Peanuts. For more than five decades, people had been reading quick-witted dialogues and satirical exchanges between Charlie Brown, Lucy, Linus, Shroeder, and Sally that it feels like you’re part of the group at one point or another. But this time, avid reader or not, Charlie Brown finally let the world know about how depressing it can be on his shoes amid being in the colorful world that he’s in. The popular, Tony Award-winning, comedy musical You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown is finally staged in Manila through the efforts of 9 Works Theatrical that opened on Saturday February 11 at Carlos P. Romulo Auditorium in RCBC Plaza, along Ayala Avenue in Makati City.

Peanut GangCarla Guevara-Laforteza plays the crabby Lucy in ‘You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown’.

Get to sympathize with dear ol’ Charlie played by Robbie Guevara as he recounts everyday occurrences in his life that depresses him like not being able to play a kite, being the only person who doesn’t receive a Valentine card, or even the fact that Snoopy only likes him because he feeds the well-loved white and black dog. Listen and be entertained as the Charlie’s list of woes goes on and on and get inspired on how he gets to cope with it the best he can. Together with commendable actors in the local theatre scene Carla Guevara-Laforteza as the vain and crabby Lucy, Franco Laurel as the blanket loving studious Linus, Tonipet Gaba as the musically-talented Schroeder, Sweet Plantado-Tiongson as funny and quirky Sally, and Lorenz Martinez as the forever loved pet Snoopy, You’re a Good Manwas able to bring to life the humor that reminds everyone of mundane things that can make a person happy or sad.

Just like in the comic strip each character was able to tackle mature themes in a much simpler tone making the audience laugh in the everyday comical life occurrence that they just overlook.

Peanut GangThe brother and sister Robbie Guevara and Carla Guevarra-Laforteza play Charlie and Lucy, respectively.

Directed by Michael Williams along with assistant director Toff de Venecia, musical director for instrumentation Joseph Tolentino, musical director for vocals Sweet Plantado-Tiongson, choreographer Deana Aquino, scenographer Mio Infante, lighting designer Martin Esteva, sound designer Chuck Ledesma, costume designers Mio Infante and Twinkle Zamora, photographer Richard Lazaro, and graphic designer Larry Palma delivers a performance you’ve always dreamed that a local artistic team will come up with. The whole musical has showcased each actor’s talent while staying true to their characters.

Peanut GangThe entire Peanuts Gang are seen in this photograph.

“I know that I don’t only speak for myself — in fact most, if not all, who are involved in this production will agree with me — but doing a local version of You’re A Good Man, Charlie Brown has always been one of my dreams,” executive producer Santi Sta. Maria expressed in one interview. “It’s just one of those things that I’ve always wanted to do, my little contribution to the local theater scene.”

Each of the cast finds his own reason to play their character and similarities to making it more enjoyable for them to portray their roles. “The material is very witty and requires a lot of comic timing from the actor,” Franco said regarding his characterization of Linus.

“The challenge for me is to find the balance between caricature and reality so that I can bring out the truth in what I’m doing even if from the perspective of a child.”

Overall, the audience enjoyed the performance as everyone made sure there was never a dull moment. The backdrop depicts the colorful cartoonish world that the Peanuts casts are in and they definitely woke up the ‘child’ in everyone with their stellar singing and dancing performances.

Friday shows are at 8 p.m,, Saturdays at 3:30 p.m. and 8 p.m., and Sundays at 3:30 p.m.

A limited number of performances are now available for fundraising and block-buying. For tickets and other inquiries, call (632) 557-5860, 586-7105 or +639175545560 or email info@9workstheatrical.com for inquiries.

Source

Crazy over the MMDA

life3

http://www.manilatimes.net/national/2008/apr/24/yehey/life/20080424lif1.html

Thursday, April 24, 2008

Crazy over the MMDA

The metro screams pink

By Angelique P. Manalad Contributor
Photos by Sarah Encabo

Imagine yourself as a probinsyano who for the first time set foot in the crazy jungle of the Metro. You’ll look around and find yourself surrounded by posters, walk bridges, side walks, urinals and other things bearing the pink color, then you’ll ask yourself, “Has Manila gone gay?”

Why Pink?

In an interview with Metro Manila Development Authority (MMDA) Director Ramon Saldua-Ona, he explained that their chairman, Bayani Fernando (he’s the one in the huge tarpaulins spread all over the city who looks like he’s hiding something in his hand), believes that the color signifies healthiness of a place or a person. Coming from the famous phrase “In the pink of health,” the chairman sees the color to be the answer for the improvement of the metro’s appearance.

Like advertisements, MMDA signs want to capture the motorists and pedestrians attention. No, they don’t think it’s a gay color, but a color of freshness and well-groomed environment.

Metro Gwapo?

You see this slogan and then you suddenly looked at the MMDA officer standing next to it. You suddenly had question marks floating above your head. No, they’re not pertaining to the officers. They want to describe the whole Metro Manila in the near future as gwapo. After their brainstorming for the perfect slogan for their beautification campaign for the streets of Manila, evolving from Metro Gwapito, Gwapong Metro and even Magandang Metro—Metro Gwapo was born. Gwapo as we all know is someone who is perfectly groomed, presentable and you really want to spend time with or in this case stay in. But it certainly isn’t the MMDA or that guy in all their billboards.

‘Walang tatawid, nakakamatay!’

If you’re not scared of crossing the street after reading this blunt-as-can-be statement, I salute you. And these signs are in screaming pink no less. Brave enough?

Admit it, you’re dying to pee

It possibly happened to you, you were on your way somewhere then you feel your bladder telling you that you have to get some relief. But you’re in the middle of walking to your office or to a station or jeepney stop. Like a heavenly answer, a spotlight came to rest on a pink urinal. You’re saved from having kidney stones later (too bad if you’re a girl though). It was established some years ago, but now became a source of distress than of relief to most citizens because of the odor it causes to people passing by. Who would want to clean it? Anyone? Volunteer now. But don’t worry; there is an on-going brainstorming in the MMDA office to improve this very helpful facility to those who are in need.

The tarpaulin of discipline

Many are saying that the huge posters bearing Fernando’s face all over the city is nothing more but an early politicking. But as Director Ona said, “Our chairman has been one of the icons of discipline here in our country. We just wanted to send the message loud and clear by putting his picture in there. It’s a statement on it’s own. Most motorists are too lazy to read and ignore the advisories we post. We want to catch their attention then they’ll read it. It just aims to portray discipline, nothing more. It’s still too early to campaign.” If you say so.

Critics of the MMDA

All they can say to their detractors was to see the improvements they already accomplished. They continue to think of ways to further improve their services for the citizens and make the Metro as gwapo as possible. So why not try answering what’s wrong with pink? Instead of the what’s with pink? No harm done in using the color right, deva?

Thursday, April 24, 2008

Crazy over the MMDA

The metro screams pink

By Angelique P. Manalad Contributor
Photos by Sarah Encabo

Imagine yourself as a probinsyano who for the first time set foot in the crazy jungle of the Metro. You’ll look around and find yourself surrounded by posters, walk bridges, side walks, urinals and other things bearing the pink color, then you’ll ask yourself, “Has Manila gone gay?”

Why Pink?

In an interview with Metro Manila Development Authority (MMDA) Director Ramon Saldua-Ona, he explained that their chairman, Bayani Fernando (he’s the one in the huge tarpaulins spread all over the city who looks like he’s hiding something in his hand), believes that the color signifies healthiness of a place or a person. Coming from the famous phrase “In the pink of health,” the chairman sees the color to be the answer for the improvement of the metro’s appearance.

Like advertisements, MMDA signs want to capture the motorists and pedestrians attention. No, they don’t think it’s a gay color, but a color of freshness and well-groomed environment.

Metro Gwapo?

You see this slogan and then you suddenly looked at the MMDA officer standing next to it. You suddenly had question marks floating above your head. No, they’re not pertaining to the officers. They want to describe the whole Metro Manila in the near future as gwapo. After their brainstorming for the perfect slogan for their beautification campaign for the streets of Manila, evolving from Metro Gwapito, Gwapong Metro and even Magandang Metro—Metro Gwapo was born. Gwapo as we all know is someone who is perfectly groomed, presentable and you really want to spend time with or in this case stay in. But it certainly isn’t the MMDA or that guy in all their billboards.

‘Walang tatawid, nakakamatay!’

If you’re not scared of crossing the street after reading this blunt-as-can-be statement, I salute you. And these signs are in screaming pink no less. Brave enough?

Admit it, you’re dying to pee

It possibly happened to you, you were on your way somewhere then you feel your bladder telling you that you have to get some relief. But you’re in the middle of walking to your office or to a station or jeepney stop. Like a heavenly answer, a spotlight came to rest on a pink urinal. You’re saved from having kidney stones later (too bad if you’re a girl though). It was established some years ago, but now became a source of distress than of relief to most citizens because of the odor it causes to people passing by. Who would want to clean it? Anyone? Volunteer now. But don’t worry; there is an on-going brainstorming in the MMDA office to improve this very helpful facility to those who are in need.

The tarpaulin of discipline

Many are saying that the huge posters bearing Fernando’s face all over the city is nothing more but an early politicking. But as Director Ona said, “Our chairman has been one of the icons of discipline here in our country. We just wanted to send the message loud and clear by putting his picture in there. It’s a statement on it’s own. Most motorists are too lazy to read and ignore the advisories we post. We want to catch their attention then they’ll read it. It just aims to portray discipline, nothing more. It’s still too early to campaign.” If you say so.

Critics of the MMDA

All they can say to their detractors was to see the improvements they already accomplished. They continue to think of ways to further improve their services for the citizens and make the Metro as gwapo as possible. So why not try answering what’s wrong with pink? Instead of the what’s with pink? No harm done in using the color right, deva?